UN's 17 Sustainable Goals


As mentioned on the United Nations’s website, the Sustainable Development Goals are “the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. These 17 objectives aim to end global challenges such as poverty, hunger, life on land, clean water and gender inequality, by the year 2030. Tackling these challenges via an ecological perspective by categorizing challenges by their intensity of influence on society, can help us navigate effective strategies to diffuse societal influences from these matters and ultimately end these global challenges. There are three concepts that help can categorize these challenges: an interpersonal level of society, an intrapersonal level of society and a community level of society (institutional factors, community factors, public policy). I have identified and prioritized 4 challenges presented from the WHO list to identify which level of society these global issues can best be resolved.

1. Hunger can best be addressed at a community level of society (public policy). Local, state and federal policies and laws (such as the Dept of Agriculture and FDA) can offer vital resolutions to hunger and poverty eradication.”

2. Poverty can best be addressed at a community level of society (public policy). Local, state and federal policies and laws can help regulate or support economic growth that is “inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality”.


3. Gender Equality can best be addressed at the interpersonal level, the intrapersonal level and community level of society (including both community factors and institutional factors). Advocating gender equality as a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world via social networks and norms, or standards, which exist as formal as informal among individuals, groups and organizations. Institutional factors such as rules, regulations and informal structures can constrain gender inequality by promoting gender equality within societal rules, regulations, policies and accepted behaviors. 

4. Clean Water and Sanitation can best be addressed at a community level of society (public policy) and (institutional factors). Local, state and federal policies and laws that regulate and support clean and accessible water for all is an essential practice for disease prevention, early detection, control, and management.


Tackling these challenges by their intensity of influence on society, can help us navigate effective strategies to diffuse societal influences from these matters and ultimately end these global challenges. Remedying the issue of infrastructure takes money Coming up with innovative technologies, creative education techniques and effective methods of raising money seems like a good idea to combat these challenges in the short term, but I have come to learn that it could just take a collaborative global effort to overcome the perceived barriers of these global issues for the long haul.

Interpersonal Level: Interpersonal processes and primary groups, including family, friends and peers that provide social identity, support and role definition

Intrapersonal Level: Individual characteristics that influence behavior, such as knowledge attitudes, beliefs and personality traits.

Community Level:

Public Policy: Local, state and federal policies and laws that regulate or support healthy actions and practices for disease prevention, early detection, control, and management.

Community Factors: Social networks and norms, or standards, which exist as formal as informal among individuals, groups and organizations.

Institutional Factors: Rules, regulations, policies, and informal structures, which may constrain or promote recommended behaviors.

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Vondechii's Vault: 

A Wicked Concoction of Witchy Wellness, Public Health and Black Girl Magic

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