Air Pollution Trends and Death Rates

April 4, 2019

 

 

According to the US EPA Air Pollution Trends website, the national average ozone levels declined in the 1980's, then plateaued during the 1990's, and decline a little after 2002. The average ozone concentration has decreased 19% since 2000 in the Northeast region of the US, according to the US EPA Air Pollution Trends website. The average ozone concentration has decreased 9% since 2000 in the Western region of the US, according to the US EPA Air Pollution Trends website. Although we are making strides to combat global warming (ex: reducing our carbon foot print, reducing air and water pollution, carbon emissions, recycle) we still have a long way to go to protect our ozone layer. We have cause so much damage to the ozone layer, that the ozone concentration (03) has been decreasing at an exponential rate. We have to take watershed action against the decrease of our ozone concentration. 

 

According to the World Health Organization in 2008, there were 1.3 million deaths related to ambient air pollution. In 2012 there were approximately 3,732,00 deaths related to ambient air pollution (AAP). In 2010, WHO estimated that the household air pollution (HAP) related deaths was responsible for 3.9 million premature deaths and ∼4.8% of lost healthy life years. In 2016, household air pollution (HAP) was responsible for 3.8 million deaths, and 7.7% of the global mortality according to the World Health Organization.


Regions of the world that reveals the highest mortality burden from combined air pollution in 2012 includes:

 

-The Western Pacific region {Consisting of: Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia,China, Cook Islands, Fiji, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Vietnam}

 

The  South East Asian regions {Consisting of Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, East Timor, Laos, Singapore, Vietnam, Brunei, Burma and Thailand} bear the highest mortality burden from combined air pollution in 2012. In the Western Pacific region of the world, 2.8 million people died from combined air pollution. In South East Asian region of the world, 2.3 million people died from combined air pollution. 

 

Resources:

 

http://www.who.int/quantifying_ehimpacts/global/en/

 

https://www.epa.gov/air-trends

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