The Evil Eye


The evil eye was first recorded by the Mesopotamians about 5,000 years ago in cuneiform on clay tablets. The evil eye is thought of as a look given to inflict harm, suffering, or some form of bad luck on those that it is cast upon. It is a look which clearly states that one intends for something bad to happen to the object of one’s focus, either out of jealousy or pure malice. The superstition of the evil eye holds that the malicious look is powerful enough to bring about actual disaster for the unfortunate person that is the receiver of the glare. It was believed that the evil eye was the largest threat to anyone who had been praised too much, or received admiration beyond what they truly deserved. The praised person would become so swollen with pride that he or she would bring about his or her own doom via the evil eye, which was believed to be able to cause physical and mental illness. It was thought that the gods and goddesses were punishing those who had become too proud of their achievements, and destroyed them with the power of the evil eye to restore them to the level of mere mortals.


A belief in the evil eye is widespread on every continent. The Middle East, Asia, Europe, and Central America all fear the evil eye and warns about the dangers of the evil eye and says that one must take a bath in order to counteract the effects of the evil eye’s power. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause one misfortune, bad luck or injury. Mal de ojo jewelry and talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called "evil eyes".

The Hindus believe that jealousy is at the root of the power of the evil eye, whether in the form of a malicious or admirable look. Interestingly, the Hindus teach that the times of change in life–as in during puberty, marriage, or childbirth–one is most vulnerable to the threat of the evil eye.


In South America, Brazil holds a superstition equivalent to the evil eye known as the “fat eye.” Compliments which are sincere are not feared to cause the evil eye to attack as in other countries, but insincere compliments are thought to put one at stake. The fear of the evil eye did not carry over to America, except in the form of a metaphor. While the superstition is not intense enough to take precaution, the evil eye is seen as impolite, and a warning that the source of the evil eye has bad intentions.


The use of evil eye amulets & the carrying of incense can protect against the evil eye. New mothers would keep objects as protection under their pillows or on their heads, and these included red, black, or white strings, a nail, gunpowder, bread, salt, garlic, a ring, indigo blue, or a pair of silver buckles. Each of these objects held a meaning which made it a good defense against the evil eye. For instance, gunpowder symbolized an ability to fight back against the evil eye. The nail symbolized strength. The indigo held its power in its blue coloring. Salt was a symbol of preservation and strength. The most popular method of escaping the evil eye’s effects in many cultures is by the use of evil eye talismans, evil eye symbols, and evil eye jewelry. These are meant to “reflect” the power of the evil look. The most basic design of the evil eye, prevalent in the Middle East, is a talisman designed with concentric blue and white circles made to symbolize the evil eye, known as the nazar. It is often used on houses, vehicles, or jewelry.


One of the most powerful examples of the evil eye amulet in the Middle East and Africa is the Hamsa, also known as the “Hand of Fatima.” The hamsa is a hand-shaped symbol with the evil eye on the palm. The hamsa can be used in wallpaper or jewelry to ward off the evil eye. The hamsa is also found in Jewish culture, where it is known as the “Hand of God” or the “Hand of Miriam.” The popularity of Kabbalah has revived the hamsa and influenced its presence in jewelry and design.


The meaning of bead colors:  Blue: The color of evil eye protection. The traditional color for good karma, positive energies and protection against the evil eye. 

Light Blue: Color of the sky – symbolizes truth and therefore it provides direct protection against the evil eye.

The 'evil eye' 'mati' 'ojo turco' 'nazar' the tradition of the charm persists, for new babies, new businesses, housewarmings and even new cars – any occasion when a 'good luck' wish is called for. Real story behind the evil eye beads or lucky eye beads. Why the blue evil eye bead is more than just a good luck charm. How to get rid of somebody's bad eye?

It's believed that there are three types of evil eyes:

1. The first are unconscious evil eyes. These harm people and things, without intending to.

2. The second type intends to harm.

3. The third one is unseen, hidden evil which is the most scared one.

It was believed that, this eye saw all the wickedness in the world and removed poverty and ignorance. When Horus opened its eyes the world was enlightened, when he closed, it became dark. From Egypt, the eye talisman had spread to the Mediterranean, Middle East and Europe. When any one looks at what is excellent with an envious eye he fills the surrounding atmosphere with a pernicious quality, and transmits his own envenomed exhalations into whatever is nearest to him.

The bead reflects the evil intent back to the onlooker. It somewhat resembles an eye and it is said the typical blue color is a factor in protecting the user. The glass beads of the Aegean islands and Asia Minor were directly dependent upon improvements in glass production. As for the color blue, it definitely first comes from Egyptian glazed mud, which contains a high percentage of oxides; the copper and cobalt give the blue color when baked.

A blue eye can also be found on some forms of the hamsa hand jewelry, an apotropaic hand-shaped amulet against the evil eye found in the Middle East. The word hamsa, also spelled khamsa and hamesh, means five referring to the fingers of the hand. In Jewish culture, the hamsa is called the Hand of Miriam; in Muslim culture, the Hand of Fatima. The Fatima amulet is called a Khamsa in Muslim world, from the Arabic word for five, and is seen as protection against the evil eye. 

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A Wicked Concoction of Witchy Wellness, Public Health and Black Girl Magic

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